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Animal Architecture Awards 2011 - The Winners
Posted: Monday, August 15, 2011 |

The winning entries for the 2011 Animal Architecture Awards have just been announced. Now in its third year, the award contest "All Creatures Great & Small" invited critical and unpublished essays and projects to address how architecture can mediate and encourage multiple new ways of species learning and benefiting from each other - or as the organizers call it, to illustrate cospecies coshaping.

View this competition brief:

Update! View this related article:

First Place: Theriomorphous Cyborg by Simone Ferracina

Click above image to view slideshow
First Place: Theriomorphous Cyborg by Simone Ferracina

Animal Architecture believes that a greater understanding of biotic and ecological relationships can influence design, reshape our cities, and restructure our homes — benefiting the human and non-human animals that interact with and around them.

The panel of award jurors comprised Neeraj Bhatia, Wortham Fellow Rice University; Ned Dodington, Founder Animal Architecture; Allison Hunter, Visual Artist; Joyce Hwang, Assistant Processor University of Buffalo SUNY, Director Ants of the Prairie; Sanford Kwinter, Professor of Architectural Theory and Criticism, Harvard GSD; Jon LaRocca, Founder Animal Architecture; Geoff Manaugh, Author of BLDGBLOG; Cary Wolfe, Professor of English at Rice University and Series Editor Posthumanities.

Each project will be published in more detail on Animal Architecture within the coming weeks, and an upcoming exhibition is also in the works.

Here are the winning entries:

First Place: Theriomorphous Cyborg
Simone Ferracina

First Place: Theriomorphous Cyborg by Simone Ferracina

Click above image to view slideshow
First Place: Theriomorphous Cyborg by Simone Ferracina

Inspired by Uexküll’s animal Umwelt, the “Theriomorphous Cyborg” is an immersive Augmented Reality game aimed at endowing participants with a non- and extra-human gaze. It is software designed to uncover alternative fields of experience and to activate novel relations between human cyborgs and their “sentient” surroundings.

Each level establishes a new and unfamiliar environment-world; LEVEL 1 endows players with the ability to perceive the Earth’s magnetic field. LEVEL 2 allows them to manipulate their own awareness of time by mixing synchronous and asynchronous signals. LEVEL 3 substitutes the participant’s eyesight with broadcasts from CCTV cameras activated by proximity.

 

First Runner Up: The Nottingham Apiary
Amelia Eiriksson, Fraser Godfrey, Ana Moldavsky, Esko Willman from the University of Nottingham

First Runner Up: The Nottingham Apiary by Amelia Eiriksson, Fraser Godfrey, Ana Moldavsky, Esko Willman from the University of Nottingham

Click above image to view slideshow
First Runner Up: The Nottingham Apiary by Amelia Eiriksson, Fraser Godfrey, Ana Moldavsky, Esko Willman from the University of Nottingham

The Nottingham Apiary project addresses the problem of collapsing bee populations, upon which humans depend to pollinate food crops. This phenomenon, Colony Collapse Disorder, is attributed to many causes, however there is no conclusive evidence for any specific one. The project aims to restore bee populations locally, with the potential to be replicated in other locations around the world. 

An existing derelict structure is used as framework for bee habitation, with hives gradually expanding and taking over. New elements, attached to the old, allow the process to happen. The folly creates a dialogue between the process, the surrounding area and the public, introducing the bees in a nonthreatening context. It acts as the entrance to the building. The visitor route follows The Plight of the Honey Bee installation, creating a gradual crescendo through the spaces.

 

Second Runner Up: Farmland World
Stewart Hicks and Allison Newmeyer of Design With Company, with Katharine Bayer and Hugh Swiatek

Second Runner Up: Farmland World by Stewart Hicks and Allison Newmeyer of Design With Company, with Katharine Bayer and Hugh Swiatek

Click above image to view slideshow
Second Runner Up: Farmland World by Stewart Hicks and Allison Newmeyer of Design With Company, with Katharine Bayer and Hugh Swiatek

Farmland World is a chain of agro-tourist resorts sprinkled across the American Midwestern countryside. Part theme park and part working farm, guests arrive to the resort via train and stay as part of 1-day, 3-day or 5-day experience packages. Capitalizing on both recent investments in high-speed rail infrastructure and the plentiful subsidies for farming, the network of resorts combines crowd-sourced farm labor with eco-tainment. Guests perform daily chores as self-imposed distractions from the toil of their daily lives. Among the countless activities offered, guests can choose to ride the Animal Farmatures, the dual natured farm implements that complete traditional farm tasks while performing grand rural-techno spectacles. When its time to leave for home, guests climb back into the train, weary and satisfied from their labors as they marvel at the passing landscape they helped transform.

 

Third Runner Up: BirdScraper
Zhong Huang

Third Runner Up: BirdScraper by Zhong Huang

Click above image to view slideshow
Third Runner Up: BirdScraper by Zhong Huang

1. Birds Die From Crashing Into Skyscrapers Windows – Over 90,000 birds die every year by crashing into skyscrapers because lights inside the buildings attract birds flying right onto their windows.

2. NYC Is The Only Major US City Without A Wildlife Rehabilitation Center – 4,000 calls from people seeking help for distressed wildlife each year and emergency care and rehabilitation to over thousands of birds; most of them were injured from crashing into the dense “concrete jungle”, New York City.

The skyscraper contains a unique ecological system that produces oxygen and sustains itself. Since the building is located in the middle of the lake, all birds feces will drop down into the lake, thus feces will turn into algae. All algae have photosynthetic machinery ultimately derived from the Cyanobacteria, and so produce oxygen as a by-product of photosynthesis. This is the idea; more birds, they will drop more feces, and there are more algae. If there are more algae, they produce more oxygen.

 

See also the Honorable Mentions in the image gallery below. All images courtesy of Animal Architecture.

Honorable Mention: Pigeon Racing Headquarters by Carla Novak Honorable Mention: Casino by Sarah Custance Honorable Mention: Bat Station by Friend and Company Architects Honorable Mention: Nestworks by 51% Studios Honorable Mention: Prosthetic Lizard Homes by Renee Davies, Cris de Groot and Martin Boult Honorable Mention: Urban Ecopoesis by Koh Hau Yeow Honorable Mention: Window Unit by Crooked Works


Comments:
Ry
USA
Sunday, August 28, 2011
When I first saw "animal architecture" it caught my eye right away! Then I found myself confused when I read the competition brief. Although I find it very interesting to see the term used in a totally new way I must say that I am wondering why these people have put on this competition for three years and did not think of a better name for it. When I think of animal architecture, I think of "Zoomorphic : new animal architecture" the book. I think of architecture inspired by nature...by animals! That is what "animal architecture" is as it was coined further back than 3 years ago.

This competition hosts an intriguing thought concept by all means! I really do like the concept of the competition very much so don't get me wrong. I just strongly believe that the name is poorly chosen and that it should be changed if a 4th one is to be held. First I feel the name "animal architecture" was already taken by the book and movement of animal architecture from the 90's to about 5 years ago. Regardless of the name stealing I feel that it does not fit what the competition is all about. The name of this competition as "animal architecture" just simply does not describe it well at all regardless of the fact that this is not "animal architecture."

Animal Architecture to me is an almost an era of architectural design like modernism, or Bauhaus. For the group hosting this competition to hijack the name "animal architecture" is almost like them trying to take Bauhaus and change the definition of the word. If you glance through the pages of Zoomorphic than you will see that "animal architecture" best describes the works displayed in that book! Can the projects shown here be best described by this term and no other? If I looked at them with no words shown for description, the word animal would not come to mind. Maybe just adding another word to it would go a long way. Maybe we need to help them think of a better name all together?

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