Facebook Twitter Pinterest
“Brick Garden” by PBC+L
Posted: Thursday, November 01, 2012 |

North Carolina architects Pearce Brinkley Cease + Lee (PBC+L) recently received a 2012 Certificate of Recognition from the NC chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects for their project, "Brick Garden," designed for the Triangle Brick Headquarters in Durham, NC.

Triangle Brick Headquarters’ “Brick Garden” in Durham, NC, designed by PBC+L

Click above image to view slideshow
Triangle Brick Headquarters’ “Brick Garden” in Durham, NC, designed by PBC+L

“Seldom does an opportunity to design a truly unique landscape feature present itself,” said Jeffrey Lee, FAIA, lead designer for the project, which includes an 18,000-square-foot building. “This was, however, the case with the Brick Garden at the Triangle Brick Headquarters.”

“Brick Garden” by PBC+L

Click above image to view slideshow
“Brick Garden” by PBC+L

Lee pointed out that the site itself, located on NC 55, has evolved from an original brick manufacturing facility and clay pit to Triangle Brick’s corporate headquarters and design center. The buildings and the Brick Garden were both designed to showcase Triangle Brick’s product line and to complement and reinforce one another.

“The Brick Garden is a unique, geometrically ordered space defined by a balanced composition of hedges, trees, lawn, ground cover, hardscape, and fixed and moveable walls,” Lee said.

“Brick Garden” by PBC+L

Click above image to view slideshow
“Brick Garden” by PBC+L

Spinning brick panels in the garden offer Triangle Brick’s customers the opportunity to view their potential choices in a variety of daylight conditions.

The garden also features trees native to North Carolina, including river birch, maple, and crepe myrtle – each of which will provide its own texture and color as the garden matures.



Comments:
Landscape Architect
Friday, November 02, 2012
So basically its just a bunch of brick display panels that spin. This could have definitely been taken to another level and it's a shame it wasn't.
Really disappointing when the rest of the firms work looks good.

Brueck
United States
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
I like it, simple and thoughtful. Note: Crepe Myrtle, or Lagerstroemia *indica,* is not native to North Carolina. It may be considered naturalized, but its from India and China.

Featured Competitions:
image
Register/Submit: Sep 1
image
Register: May 25 / Submit: Jul 13
image
Register: Sep 30 / Submit: Oct 21
image
Register: Jul 6 / Submit: Jul 30

Search News by Keyword:
Advertisement