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Holl’s “Linked Hybrid” Awarded 2009 “Best Tall Building”
Posted: Monday, July 06, 2009 |

Linked Hybrid by Steven Holl Architects named 2009 “Best Tall Building” in Asia & Australia Category by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) has named Steven Holl Architects’ recently completed Linked Hybrid complex in Beijing the recipient of the “Best Tall Building” in Asia and Australia award. 

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Click above image to enlarge
Photograph: © Shu He

Annually, the CTBUH recognizes one outstanding tall building from each of four geographical regions: Americas, Asia and Australia, Europe, and Middle East and Africa.  The “Best Tall Building Overall” will be selected from among these four recipients at the Awards Dinner on October 23 during the CTBUH 2009 Chicago Conference. Recipients must possess seamless integration of architectural form, structure, and building systems, as well as exhibit sustainable design qualities working to preserve the quality of urban life. 

image

Click above image to enlarge
Photograph: © Shu He

The 220,000 square-meter Linked Hybrid complex includes eight towers linked by a ring of eight sky bridges housing a variety of public functions. The complex is located adjacent to the former city perimeter of Beijing. To counter current urban development trends in China, the complex forms a new twenty-first century porous urban space,  inviting and open to the public from every side. In addition to more than 750 apartments, the complex includes public, commercial, and recreational facilities as well as a hotel and school. With sitelines around, over, and through multifaceted spatial layers, this “city within a city” has as one of its central aims the concept of public space within an urban environment, and can support all the activities and programs for the daily lives of over 2500 inhabitants.


image

Click above image to enlarge
Photograph: © Shu He


Tags for this entry:
asia, steven holl, tall building, linked hybrid
Comments:
Lucas Gray
Berlin, Germany
Tuesday, July 07, 2009
These are the first images I have seen of the finished project. The construction photos and design renderings peaked my interest. I think this is a wonderful project (as is most of Steven Holl's work) and a great addition to the skyline of Beijing. Too many projects in the large Chinese cities are non-descript and lack any identity. This on the other hand is bold and really creates a sense of place within the urban fabric.

victor tsu
paris, france
Wednesday, July 08, 2009
I've seen this building on a trip to beijing earlier this year. it is in fact a beautiful building, a sculpted mass with great plastic strength. It was the first Steven Holl building I ever saw in person and it was very impressing.

Nevertheless, there is an enormous gap between what everyone says about the building and the way it is in reality. All that "open to the public", "porous", "inviting urban space" talk is completely overwhelmed by the fact that there is an army of security people who decide who may and who may not enter this space.

This is exclusivity at its most potent, for it gives the impression of being open when in fact it is absolutely impervious. It is a housing complex for extremely rich people who don't necessarily want to be confronted to the harsh chinese reality today. All they'll ever need is contained in that beautiful self-centered building. It takes them away from beijing and from any social responsibility they could ever have towards their less fortunate countrymen.

Richie
Thursday, July 09, 2009
It's very interesting to read your experiences of visiting the building, Victor. I suppose it illustrates that there can sometimes be a gulf between how the architect imagines a space will work and how the client decides to manage it once the structure is built. Or is the architect unknowingly helping to facilitate this kind of sealed-off private enclave?

About the Holl building, I like the impression of a miniature interconnected city-within-a-city that it gives.. I'd be interested to know how well-used those sky corridors actually are in reality - do people really travel between the different buildings all that frequently, or is it just to give an impression of interconnectivity and community?

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