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MoMA PS1 & MAXXI Young Architects Program 2011 - The Winners
Posted: Wednesday, February 16, 2011 |

The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, and the National Museum of XXI Century Arts of Rome just announced Interboro Partners of Brooklyn, NY, as the winner of the 12th annual Young Architects Program in New York, and stARTT, of Rome, as the winner of the first annual YAP_MAXXI Young Architects Program in Rome.

Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

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Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Now in its 12th edition, the Young Architects Program at MoMA and MoMA PS1 has been committed to offering emerging architectural talent the opportunity to design and present innovative projects, challenging each year’s winners to develop highly innovative designs for a temporary, outdoor installation at MoMA PS1 that provides shade, seating, and water. The architects must also work within guidelines that address environmental issues, including sustainability and recycling. For the first time, MoMA and MoMA PS1 are partnering with another institution, MAXXI in Rome, to create the first international edition of the Young Architects Program. Interboro Partners, drawn from among five finalists, will design a temporary urban landscape for the 2011 Warm Up summer music series in MoMA PS1’s outdoor courtyard. stARTT has been chosen from among five European finalists to create an innovative event space in the MAXXI piazza. Both installations will open in June.

Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Interboro Partners’ Holding Pattern brings an eclectic collection of objects including benches, mirrors, ping-pong tables, and floodlights, all disposed under a very elegant and taut canopy of rope strung from MoMA PS1’s wall to the parapet across the courtyard. Creating an unobstructed space, the design incorporates for the first time the entire space of MoMA PS1’s courtyard under a single grand structure, while creating an environment focusing on the audience as much as the Warm Up performance. A key component of the theme is recycling; objects in the space will be donated to the community at the conclusion of the summer. The designers met with local businesses and organizations including a taxi cab company, senior and day care centers, high schools, settlement houses, the local YMCA, library, and a greenmarket to determine what components of their installation could be used by those organizations following the Warm Up summer music series. Incorporating objects that can subsequently be used by these organizations is a means of strengthening MoMA PS1’s ties to the local Long Island City community.

Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Rendering of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

The other finalists for this year’s MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program were FormlessFinder (New Haven, CT/Brooklyn, NY, Julian Rose and Garrett Ricciardi), MASS Design Group (Boston, MA, Michael Murphy), Matter Architecture Practice (Brooklyn, NY, Sandra Wheeler and Alfred Zollinger), and IJP (London/Cambridge, MA, George L. Legendre). An exhibition of the five finalists' proposed projects as well as YAP_MAXXI’s five finalists’ proposed projects will be on view at MoMA over the summer. It will be organized by Barry Bergdoll, MoMA Philip Johnson Chief Curator, with Whitney May, Department Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

Model of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Model of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Mr. Bergdoll explains, “Simple materials that transform a space to create a kind of public living room and rec room are trademarks of this young Brooklyn firm. Interboro is interested in creating elegant and unpretentious spaces with common materials. Their work has both a modesty and a commitment quite at odds with the luxury and complex computer-generated form that has prevailed in the city in recent years. With a few gestures they transform parts of the city to achieve new temporary atmospheres and attract new participants.”

Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 Director and MoMA Chief Curator at Large, adds, “MoMA PS1 is very excited about the innovative architecture of Interboro, which describes the famous MoMA PS1 courtyard as one architectural volume, especially since the YAP 2011 opening will coincide with the much anticipated opening of the new MoMA PS1 entrance kiosk by Andrew Berman Architects."

Model of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Model of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

[UPDATE Feb 23, '11]  Project Description of Holding Patterns by Interboro Partners:

REVELATION

"Holding Pattern" is the product of a sustained dialog with MoMA PS1's courtyard and its neighbors. Instead of telling it what it should be, we patiently listened to what it and its neighbors had to say, then responded in kind. The result of this dialog is a scheme doesn't so much redesign the courtyard as reveal it.

Drawing of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Drawing of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

THE ART OF MAKING DO

Time and circumstance had its way with MoMA PS1's courtyard, which in an ideal world would be shaped like a rectangle but which is in reality an irregular seven-sided polygon. Thanks to its neighbor, 2201 Jackson Avenue, which managed to muscle its way into MoMA PS1's courtyard, and to Jackson Avenue itself, which chopped off the block's southwestern corner, Warm Up has had to make do with a very odd, idiosyncratic space. The stairs in front of Warm Up's stage suggest that people should watch the audience instead of the performers, entering the museum feels like being backstage with the band, and the backdoor has been repurposed as the main entry. But as the best baseball stadiums demonstrate, having to make do with less-than-ideal conditions can yield positive outcomes.

Drawing of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Drawing of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

"Holding Pattern" reveals this situation by stringing ropes from holes in MoMA PS1's concrete wall to the parapet across the courtyard. In the same way that Hugh Ferris reveals the potential of New York City's 1916 zoning code by drawing the theoretical building envelope, we reveal the very odd, idiosyncratic space of the courtyard and simultaneously create an inexpensive and column-free space for the activity below. From the ground, the experience is of a soaring hyperboloid surface.

Holding Pattern draws inspiration from MoMA PS1's courtyard AND its neighbors. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Holding Pattern draws inspiration from MoMA PS1's courtyard AND its neighbors. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

TAKIS / TAXIS

Takis is the owner of Checker Management, a taxi cab company located across the street from MoMA PS1. Takis leases 150 cabs to 300 drivers, who show up every day between 4:00 and 6:00 to pick up their cab, gas it up, and perform routine maintenance. In the summer, when the weather is nice, Takis sets up a makeshift outdoor plaza for his employees. The plastic tables, chairs, and tent are used by the drivers to sit, talk, and-on weekends in the summer-watch the throngs of people who pour into MoMA PS1 for the Warm-Up.

"It's not much, but I do what I can to keep my drivers happy," Takis told us.

Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

As finalists of MoMA PS1's Young Architect's competition, our task is of course to think about how to keep Warm Up's patrons happy. But as Takis's story suggests, Warm-Up's programmatic requirements seating, shade, and a water feature-sometimes overlap with the needs of Warm Up's neighbors.

Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

"Holding Pattern" is a new take on recycling. For it, we talked to as many of MoMA PS1's neighbors as we could. In addition to cab drivers, we met with senior and day care centers, high schools, settlement houses, and the local YMCA, library, and greenmarket (to name just a few). We simply asked each one: is there something you need that we could design, use in the courtyard during the Warm Up, then donate in the fall, once the Warm Up is over?

The result is an eclectic collection of objects-including benches, mirrors, ping-pong tables, and flood lights-that we never would have thought to include, but that both enhance the Warm Up's program, and strengthen MoMA PS1's ties to its neighborhood.

Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Credits:

Tobias Armborst (Principal), Daniel D'Oca (Principal), Georgeen Theodore (Principal), Rebecca Beyer Winik (Project Manager), Kathleen Cahill, Cristobal Correa (Structural Engineer), Andrew Coslow, Jenessa Frey, Lesser Gonzalez, David Himelman, Jenna Kaminsky, Brian Novello, Joel Okpala, Carsten Rodin, Becky Slogeris, Jeff Thompson (Structural Engineer)

Special thanks:

Bancker Construction Corporation, Benjamin Ball, Buro Happold, Hillary Sample, NJIT Modelshop, Valerie Moss (Citibank), Takis (Checker Management) Veronica Franklin, William T. Newlin (Jacob Riis Settlement House), Eric Ragan (LIC Ballet), Irina (LIC Kids), Cedrick Green (YMCA), Chelsea Whittaker (Greenmarket), Meres (5 Pointz Aerosol Art Center), Paul Finnegan (New York Irish Center), Kryss Shane (Ravenswood NORC)

Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

Click above image to view slideshow
Conception of Holding Pattern. Courtesy of Interboro Partners.

 

WHATAMI by stARTT is based on the manufacturing of an artificial archipelago-hill, generating smaller green areas in the garden and potentially outside the museum. The hill works as a garden, injecting “green” into the concrete plateau of the museum’s outdoor space, allowing it to serve as a stage and/or parterre for concerts and other events, or as a space to rest and look at the museum itself. The artificial landscape will be punctuated by large “flowers” providing light, shadow, water, and sound. The materials proposed for the installation involve a two-fold recycling process, the supplying of the materials for the construction (straw, geo-textile, plastic) and the dismantling of the “hill” (turf, lighting).

Opened in May 2010, MAXXI was designed by Zaha Hadid and awarded Royal Institute of British Architect’s (RIBA) Stirling Prize for architecture, and has already gained a place among the elite international contemporary art and architecture museums.

The other YAP_MAXXI finalists were Raffaella De Simone/Valentina Mandalari (Palermo); Ghigos Ideas (Lissone/Mi, Davide Crippa, Barbara Di Prete and Francesco Tosi); Asif Khan (London, United Kingdom); and Langarita Navarro Arquitectos (Madrid, Spain, María Langarita and Víctor Navarro).

Rendering of WHATAMI. Courtesy of stARTT.

Click above image to view slideshow
Rendering of WHATAMI. Courtesy of stARTT.

Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator of Architecture at MAXXI, explains, “We’re very happy with the results of this program for three main reasons. First, the collaboration with MoMA proved as effective and productive as we hoped, finally allowing us a surprising insight into the most recent research in terms of architecture, public space, and landscape. Second, we were able to discover an unexpected positive quality of answers by the Italian and European young (under 35) architects involved in the project, all proposing fascinating, innovative and well developed proposals. Third, we’re delighted that we were able to choose a winning proposal which incorporates a MAXXI_specific approach to the issues of ecology, recycle, and public space.”

For the Young Architects Program 2011 selection process, MoMA and MoMA PS1 invited outside experts in the field of architecture, including architects, curators, scholars, and magazine editors, to nominate the finalists from a pool of approximately 25 candidates that included both recent graduates and established architects experimenting with new styles or techniques. After reviewing the candidates, five finalists were selected to present proposals to a panel composed of Glenn D. Lowry, MoMA Director; Kathy Halbreich, MoMA Associate Director; Peter Reed, MoMA Senior Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs; Barry Bergdoll, MoMA Philip Johnson Chief Curator, Department of Architecture and Design; Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 Director and MoMA Chief Curator at Large; Peter Eleey, MoMA PS1 Curator; Antoine Guerrero, MoMA PS1 Director of Operations and Exhibitions; and Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator, MAXXI Architettura. The five finalists and winner of the YAP_MAXXI program were selected by a panel composed of Pio Bald, President, Fondazione MAXXI; Margherita Guccione, Director, MAXXI Architettura; Anna Mattirolo, Director, MAXXI Arte; Barry Bergdoll, Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art; Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art, Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator, MAXXI Architettura; and Maristella Casciato, Associate Professor of History of Architecture, University of Bologna.



Comments:
Jeffry burchard
Boston, MA
Thursday, February 17, 2011
So from what i can tell, the proposal is for rope strung between existing horizontal edges. A one-foot wide ribbon of translucent cloth is draped from each rope providing shading while the sun is at an angle in the early morning and late afternoon. Underneath this exceptionally "invisible" "canopy" is a series of artifacts found on a saturday yard-sale extravaganza on Long Island. But they're going to donate it all to needy schools after the installation... So... Winner, winner. I highly doubt that anyone would come forward and say that this years' proposal comes even close to the ambitions of any of the previous p.s.1 proposals... Much less any of the built projects. Maybe we are missing a p iece of information that let's us know that the budget this year was cut by 90%. Surely they don't have the same money that MOS had or the same inspiration that last years "pole dance" displayed. Ok, thats enough.

Ryan
Columbus, OH
Thursday, February 17, 2011
I just wish this was better in every way.

"Objects donated to the community".... great..... How about vegetables donated to the community, or games, or innovative spaces, or a compelling architectural and artistic discourse, or a unique spatial experience, or a great venue for concerts or a place to meet a date or send a cool tweet, or........ the list goes on and on.........

justin
LA
Thursday, February 17, 2011
Well at least the party will be fun because this is by far the most boring piece of architecture ever to inhabit this space. Come on - Absolutely nothing is being pushed. Horrible choice

Sarah
Portland
Thursday, February 17, 2011
Good to see that somebody's willing to see design as being about more than just fancy renderings of art objects that just happen to also involve people.

I don't know about these reactions though... "ambitions"? "most boring piece of architecture"? "unique spatial experience"? What do you want, Disneyland?

Jake
Thursday, February 17, 2011
some architecture would be nice

junior
NY
Friday, February 18, 2011
Disneyland? Are you kidding? I can only assume you are. Go back and look at the past recipients. Do you know what they all have in common? They are interesting and engaging. Most of those weren't about fancy renderings as you so strangely put it. Go back and look and compare so you have a base before you write some nonsensical critic. This is by far the least progressive piece of architecture ever attempted PS1. - By far - I guess some people like a progressive architecture competition to be nice and normal so they can understand it better.

sayjel
Toronto
Friday, February 18, 2011
This is awful

david
brooklyn
Monday, February 21, 2011
Its success really depends on the materiality of those strips. Mos's PS1 installation was amazing for reasons that were not obvious from the renderings and models.

I'm imagining that the firm was excited to learn that they can cover the entire space with a single gesture. I can understand that. I'm just surprised by how banal the resulting form is. I'm also surprised by its complete lack of direct physical contact with the public. The public is left to touch what seems to be plywood boxes. Maybe (just maybe) this is reference to/commentary on the qualities of detachment and banality that we experience every day.

Alexander Walter
Los Angeles, CA
Wednesday, February 23, 2011
UPDATE: We added Interboro's official project description of Holding Patterns, as well as some conceptional diagrams.

Dave
Brooklyn, NY
Monday, February 28, 2011
I'm not sure why everyone is jumping up and down, yelling "where's the architecture?!". a question for all these commenters then: what is architecture? lay down some definitions and frameworks to at least give a sense of where your critique is coming from. i understand the comment about the formal simplicity of the canopy, thhtough treating it as though it is what the projext is all about seems to miss the point. the first point of the project appears to be to provide the courtyard with an envelope, albeit a thin, porous and form-fitting one. having defined the physical boundary through a material device, the design then infiltrates that boundary, not with a formal gesture, but with a sort of community-interaction device. rather than fill the courtyard with something whimsical (balls and nets) or surreal (furry pillars), the space is populated by objects that carry relational meaning for the community. this is a refreshing detour from the reliance on formal material gestures and instead allows for a critical assessment of the relationship between the institution of PS1 and the cultural milieu in which it physically resides.

for my part, i do wish that the formal expression carried out in the canopy did show some kind of responsiveness to the infiltration of the community's interest, such that we are not seeing a simple canopy connecting nearest points of multiple rooftops, but instead saw a form that was generated by the content of the space. for example, could the location of the particular items "held" for certain institutions define local points of change in the canopy, such that someone seeing the canopy from the outside would be able to distinguish different regions of the courtyard, and perhaps even associate them with particular denizens of the neighborhood.

all told, i think this is an interesting departutre for YAP, insofar as "architecture" is being operated upon across time and socioeconomic boundaries, much to the chagrin of those looking for some hot new formal gesture.

Matt
NY, NY
Monday, May 16, 2011
I think having all those happy crowds/users in this renderings is pretty optimistic....

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