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Phantom Geometry, Winner of the SCI-Arc Gehry Prize 2012
Posted: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 |

Husband-and-wife team, and 2012 SCI-Arc graduates, Liz and Kyle von Hasseln are the recipients of the inaugural Gehry Prize. The couple was recently presented with the prize for their outstanding masters thesis Phantom Geometry, a unique 3D printing method developed in the SCI-Arc Robot House with advisers Devyn Weiser and Peter Testa. This summer, the school had received a $100,000 gift from architect and SCI-Arc trustee Frank Gehry for the establishment of the institute's annual Gehry Prize.

SCI-Arc Gehry Prize 2012 - Phantom Geometry - Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln/Advisors: Peter Testa & Devyn Weiser from SCI-Arc on Vimeo.

SCI-Arc Gehry Prize 2012 - Phantom Geometry - Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln/Advisors: Peter Testa & Devyn Weiser from SCI-Arc on Vimeo.

Still from Phantom Geometry video by Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln

Click above image to view slideshow
Still from Phantom Geometry video by Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln

Project Description from Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln:

This work is centered on the development of a system for generating material volume from streaming information. The system uses UV light from a modified DLP projector to continuously and selectively cure photo initiated resin within a shallow vat system we developed for the project. The cured part is simultaneously and continually pulled away from the vat, allowing un-cured resin to flood in beneath it to be subsequently cured. The result is the material reification of streaming data that emerges along the motion path of the Stäubli robot maneuvering the vat/projector apparatus.

Still from Phantom Geometry video by Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln

Click above image to view slideshow
Still from Phantom Geometry video by Kyle & Liz Von Hasseln

This system of fabrication relies upon native real-time feed-back and feed-forward mechanisms, and is therefore interruptible and corruptible at any time. The streaming data input may be transformed or modified at any time, and such interventions impact emerging downstream geometry.



Comments:
Justin
LA
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Thesis? Argument?

Chicago
Los Angeles
Wednesday, October 24, 2012
Very nice! The first thought that comes to mind, Is how a building is built; starting from the bottom up, which in this case does not. Also I like the anthropomorphic quality that flows throughout this vertical piece, Interesting.

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