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RIBA International Award Winners 2013 Announced
Posted: Friday, June 14, 2013 |

Yesterday we published the winners of the 2013 RIBA National and EU Awards, and here are now also the twelve projects which won the institute's 2013 RIBA International Awards for architectural excellence.

The selected award winners are eligible for the RIBA Lubetkin Prize awarded to the best international building by a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (check out last year's winner). The winner of the Lubetkin Prize will be announced on September 26th at a ceremony in London.

Halley VI Antarctic Research Station, Antarctica by Hugh Broughton Architects (Photo: BAS)

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Halley VI Antarctic Research Station, Antarctica by Hugh Broughton Architects (Photo: BAS)

The 2013 RIBA International Award winners are:

Halley VI Antarctic Research Station
Brunts Ice Shelf, Coates Land, Antarctica

Architect: Hugh Broughton Architects    
Client: British Antarctic Survey
Contractor: Galliford Try International
Structural Engineer: AECOM
Services Engineer: AECOM
Completion date: Feb 2012
Cost: 25,855,000 GBP
Gross internal area per sq m: 1,510

Halley is the most southerly science research station operated by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and is located on the 150-meter thick floating Brunt Ice Shelf, which moves 400 meters per annum towards the sea. Snow levels rise by 1 meter every year, and the sun does not rise for 105 days during winter. Temperatures drop to -56˚C and winds blow in excess of 160 kph. Access by ship and plane is limited to a 3-month summer window.

The modules are supported on giant steel skis and hydraulically driven legs that allow the station to mechanically ‘climb’ up out of the snow every year. And as the ice shelf moves out towards the ocean, the modules can be lowered and towed by bulldozers further inland, and eventually taken apart when the time comes.

Bedrooms, laboratories, office areas and energy centers are housed in standardized blue modules. A larger two-story light-filled red module provides the social heart of the station and is used for living, dining and recreation. Inspiring interior design provides an uplifting environment to sustain the crew through the long dark winters, helping to combat the debilitating influence of Seasonal Affected Disorder. Halley VI incorporates medical operating facilities, air traffic control systems and CHP power plants and is a microscopic self-supporting infrastructure-free community.

Galaxy SOHO
Beijing, China

Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects
Client: Soho China
Contractor: China Construction First Building (Group) Corporation Limited
Structural Engineer: not given
Services Engineer: not given
Completion date: Oct 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 370,000

Galaxy SOHO, China by Zaha Hadid Architects (Photo: Hufton + Crow)

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Galaxy SOHO, China by Zaha Hadid Architects (Photo: Hufton + Crow)

Zaha Hadid has not done shopping centers before, but Galaxy Soho represents a welcome democratization of her work. Situated on the second of ten ring-roads that girdle and define the sprawling capital city and with an in-built link to the Metro system, this development is distinctly urban rather suburban, civic as much as it is commercial. Its creation of public space at lower ground level with well-detailed seating and fountains demonstrates a rare generosity in a country determined to out-do the west in terms of commercialization.

By breaking the building’s mass into four flowing asymmetric domes of varying height the design gets light into the deep-plan floor-plates. Each structure encloses a glazed atrium around which the internal circulation is arranged. Flowing bands of white aluminum and glass give the development an almost geological solidity and presence. 

Central Market Souk
Abu Dhabi, UAE

Architect: Foster + Partners
Client: ALDAR Properties
Contractor: Mushrif National Construction LLC No longer trading in Abu Dhabi
Structural Engineer: Halvorson and Partners
Services Engineer: BDSP
Completion date: March 2011
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 26,536

Central Market souk, Abu Dhabi by Foster + Partners (Photo: Nigel Young)

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Central Market souk, Abu Dhabi by Foster + Partners (Photo: Nigel Young)

Fosters have taken the concept of the shaded souk and applied it to the mall. Deep or dappled shade, fountains and pools that aid cooling, networks of courtyards, alleys and squares are all elements of Arabic architecture and here they are used to facilitate an indoor-outdoor architecture wherein roof and wall panels slide to enclose or open up the building according to the time of year.  A mixed mode system allows for air conditioning to be turned off in winter when the climate is temperate. When in use the condensate provides 70% of non drinkable water needs.

The scheme both replicates the stalls of traders who used to trade on the same site and the luxury goods emporia that attract high rents and high-worth shoppers. 

GOTA Residence
Zimbabwe

Architect: Studio Seilern Architects as Sforza Seilern Architects        
Client: confidential
Contractor: Elevate
Structural Engineer: Eckersley O'Callaghan
Local Structural engineer: Marcussen and Cocksedge
Services Engineer: DSA Engineering
Completion date: Oct 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 1,500

GOTA Residence, Zimbabwe by Studio Seilern Architects as Sforza Seilern Architects (Photo: Angela Geddes)

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GOTA Residence, Zimbabwe by Studio Seilern Architects as Sforza Seilern Architects (Photo: Angela Geddes)

Perched on an enormous granite boulder amongst the tree-lined surrounds to a reservoir the house asserts its presence through the expression of the deep projecting concrete slabs of the roof and the floor acting akin to geological strata jutting out at the base of the cliffs that loom up behind with their own overhangs, caves and horizontal fissures.

The daytime living spaces are truly open, at once both indoors and outdoors, but sandwiched between the dominant architectural elements of roof and floor (or more accurately elevated deck) the magnificent views out into the wider landscape are accentuated, while connection to the immediate encroaching forest is ever present.

Obvious challenges of building in Zimbabwe limit options for construction, but this is turned to advantage to give the scheme an earthy quality, through the use of locally sourced materials and even salvaged boards to shutter the concrete, itself reliant on hand-mixers.

Cooled Conservatories, Gardens by the Bay
Singapore

Architect: Wilkinson Eyre
Landscape Architects: Grant Associates
Client: National Parks Board
Structural Engineers: Atelier One
Environmental Engineers: Atelier Ten
Contractor: Who Hup Pte Ltd
Completion date: June 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 20,280

Cooled Conservatories, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore by Wilkinson Eyre Architects (Photo: Craig Sheppard)

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Cooled Conservatories, Gardens by the Bay, Singapore by Wilkinson Eyre Architects (Photo: Craig Sheppard)

The Gardens by the Bay are an outstanding example of sustainability in action, not only representing best practice but also communicating important messages about these issues to a wide public.

Two contrasting glasshouses covering more than two hectares (making them the biggest climate-controlled greenhouses in the world) feature a dry Mediterranean climate in the shallow inverted bowl, and a cooler, moist environment in the conical structure complete with a ‘mountain’ down which a waterfall descends, raising humidity levels and supporting the lush vertical planting – and a helical walk that winds in and out of a series of exhibitions about climate change.

Both biomes comprise a superstructure of radial steel ribs paired with a steel gridshell forming the substructure. Low-energy glass lets in 64% of the light but admits only 38% of the corresponding solar gain.

National University of Singapore Faculty Housing
Singapore

Architect: MKPL ARCHITECTS    
Client: confidential
Contractor: TIONG SENG CONTRACTORS (PTE) LTD
Structural Engineer: KTP CONSULTANTS PTE LTD
Services Engineer: J ROGER PRESTON (S) PTE LTD
Completion date: July 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 54,396

National University of Singapore Faculty Housing, Singapore by MKPL Architects Ltd (Photo: Robert Such)

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National University of Singapore Faculty Housing, Singapore by MKPL Architects Ltd (Photo: Robert Such)

This new development was an addition to the existing Kent Vale residential development within NUS’s land parcel. With a client brief to create an iconic building design for Kent Vale. MKPL’s scheme provides a strong civic quality, adventurous use of high rise greenery and the planning of facilities for faculty members and their families, where the university hopes to promote interaction amongst in a relaxed environment.

With two towers of residential and one tower of serviced apartments, the ground floor is dedicated to a slightly more formal setting. Porticos formed by a five or six story high volume are provided at the ground floor of every apartment block. Designed to be semi public space, whereby residents can gather or meet just outside the secured zone. These porticos are linked to the communal facilities block through a lushly landscaped garden, complete with reflective pools. The entire communal facility block is surrounded by a generous double story high Verandah.

Completing the successful objective to provide as much opportunity as possible for faculty and their families to mingle and interact, creating their own memorable experience.

Fitzgerald Street Social Housing Development
Baldivis, Australia

Architect: JCY Architects and Urban Designers    
Client: Department of Education
Contractor: PACT Construction PTY LTD
Structural Engineer: BG&E
Services Engineer: Aurecon
Completion date: Sept 2012
Cost: 40,000,000 USD
Gross internal area per sq m 11,500

Fitzgerald Street Social Housing Development, Australia by JCY Architects and Urban Designers (Photo: Damien Hatton)

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Fitzgerald Street Social Housing Development, Australia by JCY Architects and Urban Designers (Photo: Damien Hatton)

This contemporary mixed-use development provides a variety of low cost affordable housing dwellings, 49 in total, with a high quality design outcome.

The scheme responds to the conditions of the local climate and is orientated to maximize sustainable living solutions, including passive solar heating, cooling, cross-ventilation and day lighting strategies.

Constructed with a simple palette of materials and colors to provide a fresh modern appearance, this is a worthwhile and successful investment from the State Community Housing Investment program initiative

Francis Gregory Library
Washington DC

Architect: Adjaye Associates
Architect of Record: Wiencek Associates    
Client: DCPL
Contractor: HESS Construction + Engineering Services
Structural Engineer: Restl Designers, Inc
Services Engineer: Setty & Associates
Completion date: June 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m 22,500

Francis Gregory Library, USA by Adjaye Associates (Photo: Jeffery Sauers)

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Francis Gregory Library, USA by Adjaye Associates (Photo: Jeffery Sauers)

The sketch-like quality of the Francis Gregory Library suggests a woodland folly – a building that is a pavilion within Fort Davis Park. Views of the park are framed from within, while the exterior of the building both reflects and complements the dense composition of trees and the striking natural environment.

Viewed from the street, the building appears to flicker with the changing light, providing a lens through which to see into the park. The two-story library provides space for three major library services: adults, teenagers and children.

There is also a public meeting room and conference rooms. Achieving LEED Silver, the design strategy is highly sustainable, with the building taking advantage of the natural vegetation, maximizing the winter sun exposure and controlling the summer sun with a large canopy over the pavilion.

The Aleph
Buenos Aires, Argentina

Architect: Foster + Partners
Associate architect: Berdichevsky-Cherny Arquitectos
Client: Faena Group
Contractor: Caputo S.A
Structural Engineer: Jose Norberto Galay
Services Engineer: Buro Happold
Completion date: Jan 2013
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 17,500

The Aleph, Argentina by Foster + Partners (Photo: Nigel Young)

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The Aleph, Argentina by Foster + Partners (Photo: Nigel Young)

The Faena Aleph Residences form part of the reinvention of the former docks of Puerto Madero in the east of Buenos Aires. During the 19th Century, the area formed part of a busy working port, but during the latter part of the 20th Century it fell into disrepair.

The nine-story building, the first project by the practice in South America, is located on Avenida Juana Manso, the main route through Puerto Madero. Drawing on local architectural traditions, the 50 apartments feature vaulted living spaces and deep, sheltered terraces that exploit the wonderful local climate and maximize views towards the city and Rio de la Plata.

Inspired by traditional housing in Buenos Aires, where the boundaries between inside and outside living are blurred, the design features split-level living spaces that extend into generous balconies and double-height patios. There is also a landscaped garden for residents to the rear and an infinity pool at roof level.

Via Verde - The Green Way
Bronx, NY

Architect: Grimshaw
Architects of Record: Dattner Architects
Landscape Architect: Lee Weintraub Landscape Architects
Client: Jonathan Rose Companies and The Phipps Houses Group
Contractor: Lettire Construction
Structural Engineer: Robert Silman Associates
Services Engineer: Ettinger Engineering Associates
Completion date: July 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 30,007

Via Verde - The Green Way, USA by Grimshaw (Photo: David Sundberg)

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Via Verde - The Green Way, USA by Grimshaw (Photo: David Sundberg)

Via Verde is a pathfinder project in so many ways: the first ever architectural design competition for social housing in New York City, with a brief that called for a highly sustainable building that would support and encourage healthy living, from the use of stairs to the growing of vegetables on its green roofs; a successful pattern of mixed tenure unique in New York; and finally a design concept that could be rolled out in further housing projects across the Five Boroughs.

Grimshaw’s hi-tech heritage serves the project well – the solar arrays look perfectly at home with the aesthetic of prefabricated panels, metal window frames and balconies and wood panel accents used in the tower, the apartment block and the townhouses.

William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library
Washington DC

Architect: Adjaye Associates
Architect of Record: Wiencek Associates        
Client:DCPL
Contractor: Coakley & Williams Construction, Inc.
Structural Engineer: Restl Designers, Inc
Services Engineer: Setty & Associates
Completion date: June 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 2,090

William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, USA by Adjaye Associates (Photo: Jeffery Sauers)

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William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, USA by Adjaye Associates (Photo: Jeffery Sauers)

The William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library is characterized by its celebration of views across the neighborhood, creating a civic building within a residential context and the insertion into the dramatically sloping site topography.

Rather than a single monolithic form, the library is a cluster of geometric volumes, both elevated and grounded physically to the site. Using the grounded main volume to host the library central stacks and primary reading, the elevated volumes create a welcoming portico at the entrance that can be used for events and informal gatherings. The volumes mediate the scale of the building by using small, medium and large forms, derived from the library’s program but also capturing the surrounding urban fabric and the site topography, while resonating with neighboring residences of a similar composition.

Wrapped in a concrete and glazed skin replete with timber fins, the envelope not only resolves structural and shading requirements, but also articulates the vertical presence of the building juxtaposed to the sloping landscape.

Bodrum International Airport
Mugla, Turkey

Architect: Tabanlioglu Architects
Client: Astaldi S.p.A
Contractor: Astaldi S.p.A
Structural Engineer: Emir Engineering
Services Engineer: METTA GMD Engineering
Completion date: June 2012
Cost: confidential
Gross internal area per sq m: 100,967

Bodrum International Airport, Turkey by Tabanlioglu Architects

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Bodrum International Airport, Turkey by Tabanlioglu Architects

Bodrum International Airport is the exception to the rule that airports tend to be non-places. The clear, efficient diagram is mitigated by the use of local materials, particularly the black marble used for floors, as well as steel, aluminum and glass. The glass is clear, opaque, or screen-printed, balancing mountain views with control of solar gain.

The design engenders an airport as calm and relaxing as it is possible for this building type to be. There are open terraces both on air- and land-side, where, despite the requirement of security, passengers can escape the busyness of the airport. And inside the fact not all flights leave on time is recognized in the design of seats that allow people to lie down.

Angela Brady, President of the RIBA said: “The RIBA International Awards set the standard for great architecture; it is wonderful to recognize such a wide variety of amazing buildings from around the world. These are projects that represent architectural excellence on an international level, projects that go beyond the brief and exceed the client’s expectations. Investing in good design for our towns and communities is vital; even in hard times we must continue to create vibrant and inspiring buildings and places for future generations to use and enjoy. This year’s winners are hugely exciting and I wish the RIBA International Award winners the best of luck as contenders for the RIBA Lubetkin Prize.”



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